Article Socio Economic Impacts of Insufficient Cow Milk Production in Mauritius

S. Tagba *

Department of Agriculture and Food Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Mauritius, Mauritius

D. Puchooa

Department of Agriculture and Food Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Mauritius, Mauritius.

H. Sina

Department of Biochemistry, University of Abomey-Calavi, Benin.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Aims: Due to the increase in purchasing power, milk and dairy products have increased steadily in recent years. However, milk production remains insufficient to satisfy the high local demand for milk and dairy products in Mauritius. Adding to the problem of the sector's extinction is the lack of information on the socio-economic impact of dairy production. This study aimed to assess the socio-economic impact of milk production on dairy cattle farms in Mauritius.

Methodology: A survey was carried out among 11 respondents in Mauritius, using a validated two-part questionnaire to collect data from dairy farmers and processors.                                

Results: The survey showed that the majority of dairy farmers were ethnic Hindus with secondary (77.8%) or university (22.2%) education. The breeds of cattle raised are generally Creole (56%) and Friesian (44%) with extensive livestock farming being practised. For the majority (77.8%) of respondents, family members are the primary source of labour. The main purpose of raising cattle is to produce milk (55.5%). The price of a litre of milk varies between dairy farmers, ranging from Rs 45 to Rs 70 per litre, with an average of Rs 58 per litre, and the revenue per cow per day averages Rs 1.036. About cheese production, the source of acquisition of cheese production technology is apprenticeship. From an economic point of view, with regard to yield, cost of production and profit margin for cheese production, we were faced with a total refusal of response from the producers. However, the quantity of milk used per day, the quantity of cheese obtained and the unit price per kg of cheese vary from one producer to another.

Conclusion: This study has led to the realization that milk is the   source of livelihood for the farmer and his family but also for other consumers. The income from the sale of milk contributes to the purchase of food for the farmer’s household and livestock supplements. However, the size of the herd and the low production of milk are an obstacle to the development of this sector.

Keywords: Keywords, Mauritius, socio-economic impact, dairy Products, dairy Farm, livestock


How to Cite

Tagba, S., D. Puchooa, and H. Sina. 2024. “Article Socio Economic Impacts of Insufficient Cow Milk Production in Mauritius”. Asian Journal of Agricultural Extension, Economics & Sociology 42 (6):215-29. https://doi.org/10.9734/ajaees/2024/v42i62482.

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