Open Access Minireview Article

Profitability of Sugarcane Production and Its Contribution to Farm Income of Farmers in Kaduna State, Nigeria

M. Sulaiman, Z. Abdulsalam, M. A. Damisa

Asian Journal of Agricultural Extension, Economics & Sociology, Page 1-9
DOI: 10.9734/AJAEES/2015/18987

Aims: Aims of the study were to determine how profitable is sugarcane production and its contribution to farm income of farmers in Kaduna state.

Study Design: Primary data were collected for this study from sugarcane farmers through the use of well structured questionnaires.

Place and Duration of Study: This study was carried out in Maigana Agricultural Zone of Kaduna state, Nigeria between September and December 2014 cropping season.

Methodology: Multistage-stage sampling technique was employed for data collection.

Results: A total of 330 respondents were randomly selected and interviewed. The net farm income of sugarcane farmers in the study area per hectare was realized to be N78,036.05 k. The results also revealed that the average return on investment was N1.83 k; meaning that for every N1 invested in sugarcane production in the study area, a profit of N1.83 k was realized by the farmers. Also, sugarcane production in the study area contributed averagely to about 19.55% of the farmers’ annual farm income.

Conclusion: It is concluded that sugarcane production in the study area was profitable despite the problems encountered; that none of the farmers solely depended on sugarcane farming as his only source of income; rather majority of them (i.e. about 80%) earned most of their income from other sources annually.

Open Access Original Research Article

Perception of the Constraints Affecting Maize Production in the Agricultural Zones of Kogi State, North Central, Nigeria

H. I. Opaluwa, S. O. Ali, S. O. Ukwuteno

Asian Journal of Agricultural Extension, Economics & Sociology, Page 1-6
DOI: 10.9734/AJAEES/2015/16003

The study focused on the perception of the constraints affecting the production of maize in the agricultural zones of Kogi State, North Central Nigeria. The data for the study were collected in 2012 from 100 respondents form each of the four agricultural zones in the study area giving rise to a total of 400 maize farmers through a multistage sampling technique by the use of structured questionnaire. The collected data were analyzed through analysis of variance (ANOVA). The study categorized the constraints faced by maize farmers in the study area into production and distributional constraints. The result of the study on the production constraints showed that even though these constraints existed in zone A, it was not as serious as those in other zones. It further showed that low productivity, lack of improved varieties, inadequate/lack of mechanical services (such as tractor hiring), lack/inadequate access to herbicides and inaccessibility to good roads were perceived to be prevalent in agricultural zone B while lack of education and technical skills and lack/inadequate access to fertilizers were perceived serious in zone C. Farmers in zone D perceived that high interest rate on borrowed funds, land ownership, scarcity of labour, high cost of production and poor credit accessibility to be the major constraint affecting their maize production activities. The outcome of the distributional constraints indicated that all the constraints studied were more severe in zone B than those in other zones of the study area. These constraints are; fluctuating prices of outputs, inadequate storage facilities, poor marketing facilities, poor market information, lack/inadequate access to good transportation facilities, Inadequate processing facilities and lack of finance. The study concluded by advocating that policy engendering should be location specific due to the peculiarity of the constraints faced by the farmers and the difference in the environments where maize is produced.

Open Access Original Research Article

Processes of Development as Reflected in Land Use Characteristics of Agricultural Cooperatives in Israel, 1921-1991: A Case Study of the Moshav vs. the Kibbutz

Yoav Gal, Roni Gal, Efrat Hadas

Asian Journal of Agricultural Extension, Economics & Sociology, Page 1-20
DOI: 10.9734/AJAEES/2015/19189

The structure and function of the family farm in Israel might become a central theme in discussions on the question of food security in 2050. Therefore, a discussion of the future organizational structure for agricultural production required is an important issue. The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of the long-term historical development of two different types of rural settlements as part of a broader debate on the future place of the family farm in Israel. Different aspects related to the importance of the family farm as a cost effective production unit are being raised today for assessment in different planning frameworks, and in many cases without any consideration of a historical perspective. The results of our study show that the two communities had become specialized farms and that the family farm also tended to move toward larger sized units that allowed for economies of scale in agricultural production. This article is part of a preliminary research effort towards a comprehensive assessment of this topic and deals with the background and development of two typical organizational structures that were involved in agricultural production in Israel between the years 1921-1991.

Open Access Original Research Article

Supply Responsiveness of Nigerian Fisheries to Price and Policy Factors from 1971-2010

U. Onuche, G. A. Abu, P. I. Ater, T. A. Ameh

Asian Journal of Agricultural Extension, Economics & Sociology, Page 1-10
DOI: 10.9734/AJAEES/2015/17086

In this study the long run and short run supply responsiveness of Nigerian fisheries sector to price and policy variables for the 1971 to 2010 period were estimated using the bounds testing approach to cointegration. The goal was to present policy makers with empirical evidence of the viability of economic policies. The work was undertaken using time series data on fish production from 1971-2010. These data were obtained from the Federal Department of Fisheries, National Bureau of Statistics, Central Bank of Nigeria and the FAO. Results show that fish supply was generally inelastic to price and policy variables in both long and short run implying that although prices and policy variables are important, they have not elicited the desired change for the fisheries subsector. Proper policy mix to support price initiatives, like provision of more loans, and increased productivity through training as well as access to modern equipments may provoke greater elasticities.

Open Access Original Research Article

Resource Use Efficiency in Sugarcane Production in Kaduna State, Nigeria: An Application of Stochastic Frontier Production Function

M. Sulaiman, Z. Abdulsalam, M. A. Damisa, F. Siewe

Asian Journal of Agricultural Extension, Economics & Sociology, Page 1-11
DOI: 10.9734/AJAEES/2015/18630

Aims: The aim of the study is twofold; to determine how the resource inputs were efficiently used and describe how socio-economic characteristics of sugarcane farmers affected the efficiency of sugarcane producers in Kaduna state.

Study Design: Primary data were collected for this study from sugarcane farmers through the use of well structured questionnaires.

Place and Duration of Study: This study was carried out in Maigana Agricultural Zone of Kaduna state, Nigeria between September and December 2014 cropping season.

Methodology: Multistage-stage sampling technique was employed for data collection.

Results: A total of 330 respondents were randomly selected and interviewed. The analysis revealed that the coefficients of the resource inputs farm size, cutting (sett), fertilizer, labour and agrochemical had positive sign, thus conformed to the a priori expectation. The average practice technical efficiency was found to be 89%

Conclusion: These resource inputs were found to be inelastic and not intensively being utilized. Hence, the farmers should increase the rate of inputs used in order to optimize efficiency in sugarcane production in the study area.

Open Access Original Research Article

Livestock Farming for Employment Generation in Etche Local Government Area of Rivers State, Nigeria

F. E. Nlerum, O. J. Owen

Asian Journal of Agricultural Extension, Economics & Sociology, Page 1-8
DOI: 10.9734/AJAEES/2015/19060

Aims:   The aims of the study determined the current socio-economic characteristics of livestock farmers, identified the types of livestocks reared in the area, identified the sources of extension information to livestock farmers, ascertained the kind of technologies provided by extension service to livestock farmers, analyzed the benefits of extension services to the farmers and determined the constraints to livestock farming in the area.

Study Design: A survey system which was made up of the random sampling technique was adopted in selecting the respondents for the study. Data were elicited with the questionnaire which was ethically considered appropriate for the literate respondents.

Place and Duration of the Study: The place of this study was Etche Local Government Area of Rivers State, Nigeria.  Survey for the study was conducted between the 10th of February, to 30th of June, 2010.

Methodology: The sample size of the study was 60 livestock farmers who served as the respondents to the study. Data were obtained with both the questionnaire for the literate respondents and interview schedule for illiterate respondents in the study area. The instruments were administered by an enumerator who was trained for this purpose. Methods of data analyses used for the study were frequency, percentage, and analysis of variance.

Results: Result shows that the average age of livestock farmers was 35.5 years indicating they are young and active, meaning that livestock farming can be used to provide employment for unemployed youths in the area.  Poultry farming was more (65%) than other stocks, meaning that investment in poultry farming will provide more employment than other livestock sectors. Simple pen sanitation with 28.3% was the technology of highest delivery to livestock farmers. The main source of agricultural information to the farmers were neighbours and friends with 45%. The problems of pests and diseases with 96.7% and poor markets for sale of livestock output with 85% were the main constraints to livestock farming. 

Conclusion: The study concludes that livestock farming is useful in employment generation in the study area. For livestock farming to generate more employment in the area, development agencies should provide enough and affordable livestock drugs and vaccines and market for the sale of livestock outputs in the area.